Heel spur or calcaneal spur

Heel spur or calcaneal spur :

calcaneal spur (or heel spur) is a small osteophyte (bone spur) located on thecalcaneus (heel bone). Calcaneal spurs are typically detected by a radiological examination (X-ray).

When a foot bone is exposed to constant stress, calcium deposits build up on the bottom of the heel bone. Generally, this has no effect on a person’s daily life. However, repeated damage can cause these deposits to pile up on each other,causing a spur-shaped deformity, called a calcaneal (or heel) spur. Obese people, flatfooted people, and women who constantly wear high-heeled shoes are most susceptible to heel spurs.Major symptoms consist of pain in the region surrounding the spur, which typically increases in intensity after prolonged periods of rest. Patients may report heel pain to be more severe when waking up in the morning. Patients may not be able to bear weight on the afflicted heel comfortably. Running, walking, or lifting heavy weight may exacerbate the issue


Apply an icepack. Place your icepack on your heel for 10 to 15 minutes at least twice a day. You can also try rolling your foot over an iced can or bottle if your heel spurs are accompanied by plantar fasciitis.

Get some rest. You need to stay off of your aching foot as much as possible for at least a week.

  • Think about possible causes of the problem while you’re resting and figure out how you can make some changes. Some actions that can contribute to heel spurs include:
  • Running too often or running on hard surfaces such as concrete
  • Tight calf muscles
  • Shoes with poor shock absorption
  • Ease back into your activities. In many cases, you’ll be in too much pain to go ahead with a strenuous exercise routine that puts pressure or impact on your heel. Listen to your body and switch to different activities such as swimming or riding a bike until your heel spurs improve.

Custom Orthotic Insoles- Proper footwear with an orthotic insole provides comfort and eliminates pain with time.